August 14, 2014

Treadwall Training with Piz (green triple)

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com

The green holds were sent to me in a package from Treadwall. They were grouped together by color of course and by shape. They are meant to be useful for warming up and for working powerful long moves. This route is all about longer moves and using good technique. I twist to reach the holds rather than staying straight on in my movements. Occasionally, I will reach straight on and that is more of a power move.

Why do I go for three in a row. I want to watch how I respond to fatigue (while watching my technique). It will help me focus on proper form when I am on a real climb outside!

Enjoy.                       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=124A8yS1m_I
            

Treadwall Training with Piz

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com  

Some thoughts about training.
How a treadwall works in damp conditions.
Trying hard!
Watch and enjoy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzQvpIdc9-c


           

Dolomite Part 2

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com


 The always beautiful northern Italy.
 Well manicured lands.
 BOOM!
 The glacier on the backside of the Marmolada.
 We walked and ran and slid our way down the mountain after climbing 2000' of perfect limestone! Then we hitchhiked back to the car. Good times.
 The hike up to the refugio. It took about 45 minutes from where we parked in the woods below to get to the hut where we got beta. rested and ate before the climb.
 Chris and I on the hike.
 The right side of the photo is the Marmolada. Tons of routes, tons of climbing, tons of run.
 A photo of the routes in the refugio. We figured it would help us on while on route.
The hut where we slept the night before the climb. Great food and a super place to meet random travelers! Don't forget to watch the goats play in the hills!

             

August 12, 2014

Planning to Send this Fall? How will you do that?

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org    www.brewersledge.com  

This is the time to be getting ready and tuning up for your fall redpoint season.
How are you going to do that? Are you going to try the same old way as you have every other year or are you going to attempt to use a systematic approach that addresses your weaknesses?

Here are some suggestions to get ready! (they are in no particular order)






  1. Pick an objective. That can be a climb or boulder problem, short or long, steep or vertical. If you don't have something to train for it is difficult to assess your weakness and then train with intent.
  2. Be realistic but aim high. Don't just pick something that you are already close to accomplishing, choose something that is out of your comfort zone. By addressing all those areas that are difficult for you, you will become a better climber.
  3. Assess how much time that you have to give to the training. You need to meet your lifes obligations so plan your training accordingly.
  4. Identify training days and fun days (at the crag or gym). You can't make every single day a training day, you have to build in the fun and vice versa, you can't expect to progress if you just go and screw off all day in an undirected manner.
  5. Find a training partner with a similar schedule or training plan. That way you have someone to psyche you up if you are slacking on a day or two. A partner allows you to climb routes too!
  6. Build in rest time! Without rest you don't recover.
  7. Plan Plan Plan and then follow through! That means don't spend your time climbing slab if you want to get better at overhangs! Choose your climbs and boulders to meet your needs. That might take you out of your routine but that is good, you need to step out to step up.
  8. Get a trainer or a training book. There are many out there that are very good at helping people progress. We are never too good to improve! Be open to constructive criticism. Even Ondra needs a coach!   
  9. Make it fun! If you aren't smiling at the end of the day, then your taking it to serious. It's climbing folks, we are not saving the world or solving world problems. : )        

Dolomite Trip! (June 2014)

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then...      Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com  

        

 The trip began after two flights, a long layover and some night time driving through northern Italy.
We arrived in Arco, Italy and pulled into the only open campground next to the old down town. Italian campgrounds are great, small stores with all the staples that you need, swimming pools, showers and full support for your climbing, biking or vacationing enjoyment. We slept late trying to get used to the time change and recover from the travel and got some climbs in at the local popular wall called Massone. There are climbs from 5.6 to 5.15 and lots of them. The limestone is streaked and beautiful. It faces the east/south so the sun shines on it in the morning and leaves the best conditions to the afternoon in the summer. Winter however, your best time is the morning.
The rock is polished but that is what happens to limestone. It is great fun no matter what!
 A route topo at the parking area of the wall.
 We were in Italy to climb in the Dolomites and Arco is just a few hours from Milan and a great place to climb with literally thousands of climbs to choose from. The routes are 50-2500ft, most of which are sport climbs (even the long ones). Because our destination was the big walls up north we headed out that afternoon towards the Marmolada (at 2500ft tall mountain with tons of amazing climbs on them where you walk off on the glacier after finishing. Here Chris checks out a mountain lake with a small castle overlooking it. Yeah Italy is that good!
 We quickly arrived in the heart of the Dolomites and tried to find out where the heck we were with respect to our dated guidebooks. Walls like this are commonplace. All of which have HUGE adventure climbs on them that are just a short approach from the car.
We stopped for the night in another great campground and enjoyed a meal in town during the world cup. Pizza and the Dolomites make me a happy camper : )

There is not any legal free camping in the Dolomites. It is a national park but the areas have been preserved for everyone to enjoy. There are cabins and hotels and campgrounds everywhere that can satisfy your need to sleep outside.

To be continued...

Where Does Your Motivation Come From? Some Rambling Thoughts.

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs


Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com  

 As promised I will chat a bit about motivation. I think that there are two kinds of motivation
  1. Internal
  2. External
As a climber who wants to continue moving forward and challenging myself I have to look at my motivation every once in a while.

I have always wanted to accomplish things/climbs in my life for me. I think that would place me on the internally motivated level. I never try a climb because I am looking for gratification or praise from someone else, rather I try because I am interested in seeing what it is like and whether or not I can complete it.
Sometimes that internal motivation can rise and fall due to life though. Let's say that you have many other obligations and duties and that you have not been able to keep up with your desired fitness level. Then your internal motivation may ebb and flow with your fitness. I see that happen regularly with me. As life's obligations keep every minute of life filled, I feel that each second must have a reason in order to get it all done!

 I have not tried a "hard" route for myself in years. When I say that it is because I understand the commitment level that it takes to complete one in a reasonable amount of time. I look for routes just under my limit because they are easier to achieve in just a few attempts instead of 50 and perfect conditions. So I would say that my motivation is for regular success rather than for the "big one".
This Fall will be the same, but I feel like I will be able to seek out the big one soon!.

Some folks believe that because that I am sponsored by climbing companies that I am under some requirement. In a way I am. I need to represent each brand in the best possible way and help buyers understand the product so that they purchase the right tool for the job. I am always motivated to do that, its in my blood as a teacher. When it comes to some climbing achievement or photo, that stuff is just icing on the cake.

I am normally most motivated by a route and the journey towards the send. I am especially motivated for first ascents. There is something about figuring out and creating a timeless route that can't be duplicated. I really enjoy the process.

As far as those who are externally motivated, I have seen them thrive and succeed, but most of the time they burn out or quit. I think that the passion must come internally in order to pursue an activity for a lifetime.

How are you motivated?






Can't Find the Time!

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs

Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!

piz : )

Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com





Since I left for Italy this summer, I have been on a whirlwind of trips, work, family adventures and climbs!
My two children keep me busy until the point of passing out these days and getting to my blog which has been easy in the past has not been as easy.

I finally started training again and am three weeks into circuits and my Treadwall program.
What does that look like in my life?
It started out at 8pm every night except friday, but now has settled into two a days.
I begin at 5am and circuit and then at 8pm that night I Treadwall.
That allows me to have more freedom the other nights of the week and to get the volume and fatigue level that I am striving for in addition to the amount of rest that I need to perform and progress.

Combine that with my kids are still not sleeping through the night I am often (mostly) sleep deprived.

So my point is that you can figure out how to fit it in if you are motivated. See the next post to read my thoughts about Motivation.

piz : )
            

July 28, 2014

It's Not Getting Any Easier

Contact Piz at pizem@hotmail.com for Motivational/Instructional/Entertaining Speaking Engagements, Climbing Instruction, Training and Weekly/Monthly Training Programs


Until then... Get outside and have an adventure!


piz : )


Thanks to my amazing sponsors: www.arcteryx.com   www.camp-usa.com   www.scarpa.com   www.sterlingrope.com   www.americanalpineclub.org   www.brewersledge.com






 I am into my 20th year of calling myself a climber. Other than playing ice hockey, I have not participated at an obsessed level in anything this long. I stopped playing hockey when I was 24 years old and realized that it wasn't as fun as it used to be. I enjoyed the physical contact and the intensity that competition brings out in folks. But at 24, I started feeling the wear and tear of the games and my body beginning to tell me that I wasn't a kid anymore.




Now I am at the same crossroad's with climbing, except that I understand how to continue climbing long into my future. I am not at competition with the team down the road, nor do I have to take on routes that will hurt me, I know what I love to climb on and the adventures that I can seek out and it is a great feeling. Knowing that my passion for the outdoors and for trying hard will never go allows me to always set goals and go for them.




I will say that staying in shape and reaching my personal climbing potential has not gotten easier over the years. Even though I am confident in my fitness evaluation and planning ability, having the time and energy to follow through is difficult. I thought that as my kids grew older and became more independent that making time for training would be easier, but it still ends up being before work at 5 am in the morning or after they go to bed from 8pm till whenever. Even with my Treadwall, I still have to train on it at odd hours! Additionally, every time that I take a break from training it feels like coming back to work after a long vacation! And we all know how that feels : )




I guess that my point is that if you want to reach your personal goals that it will always be tough. It will always mean sacrifice and you will always need a support system. Climbing or doing anything needs to be for the right reasons, as long as you have that perspective it will be a part of your life for a long time!




Just the other day I actually got my three year old to wear his climbing harness. The initial sell of it was not successful this past winter, but yesterday I was able to get him to wear it and have a good time. My future climbing plans involving making sure that my kids are exposed to it while the focus is being outside and enjoying nature. If they like climbing then great and if not they will at least have tried it out.  
  
Check out the link of my son getting used to hanging in a harness!      http://youtu.be/1pIrgvdtLsk